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Moving From Windows to Linux

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Gallivan
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Post by Gallivan » Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:03 am

Nice background!

Oh yeah, I switched back to Windows.
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gorzuate
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Post by gorzuate » Thu Oct 04, 2007 12:08 am

Gallivan wrote: Oh yeah, I switched back to Windows.
:ohnoes:
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Steu
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Post by Steu » Thu Oct 04, 2007 1:15 am

So....which game is your addiction? :heh:
Gallivan
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Post by Gallivan » Thu Oct 04, 2007 10:55 am

Adobe Photoshop. :D

I also had latency issues with numerous online games, so I figured until I actually used Linux for immense coding, windows would be fine.
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Steu
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Post by Steu » Thu Oct 04, 2007 11:07 am

I've installed linux numerous times but I keep going back to windows cause I keep wanting to play games that aren't for linux and/or don't run well on Wine. Eventually I want to get a 2nd machine so I can have both a windows and a linux box.
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Roots
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Post by Roots » Thu Oct 04, 2007 2:21 pm

Steu wrote:I've installed linux numerous times but I keep going back to windows cause I keep wanting to play games that aren't for linux and/or don't run well on Wine. Eventually I want to get a 2nd machine so I can have both a windows and a linux box.
You don't need a 2nd machine. I repartitioned my hard drive and installed Windows XP on a new partition I created, and setup grub to allow me to boot to Linux (by default) or Windows XP. I had absolutely no difficulties in doing this, and now I can play games in Windows with my primary desktop (with all the best hardware). The only drawback of course is that to switch between operating systems, I have to reboot my PC.

I know its also possible to create a FAT32 partition to allow Linux and Windows to share files, but I don't do anything productive in Windows anyway so I haven't bothered with it.
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Post by Jetryl » Thu Oct 04, 2007 2:23 pm

Gallivan wrote:Adobe Photoshop. :D

I also had latency issues with numerous online games, so I figured until I actually used Linux for immense coding, windows would be fine.
Yeah, photoshop is kind of a clincher, because the Gimp just isn't a suitable replacement for serious work.

Which is really a shame, because Photoshop itself has a lot of serious problems of design - gimp unfortunately didn't target themselves at fixing these issues, and instead just ... kinda threw stuff together. Admittedly they had a lot on their plates, implementing a whole widget kit, and an extremely non-trivial application all at the same time, but that doesn't negate their overall failure to improve on their competition.
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Steu
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Post by Steu » Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:43 pm

Roots wrote:
Steu wrote:I've installed linux numerous times but I keep going back to windows cause I keep wanting to play games that aren't for linux and/or don't run well on Wine. Eventually I want to get a 2nd machine so I can have both a windows and a linux box.
You don't need a 2nd machine. I repartitioned my hard drive and installed Windows XP on a new partition I created, and setup grub to allow me to boot to Linux (by default) or Windows XP. I had absolutely no difficulties in doing this, and now I can play games in Windows with my primary desktop (with all the best hardware). The only drawback of course is that to switch between operating systems, I have to reboot my PC.

I know its also possible to create a FAT32 partition to allow Linux and Windows to share files, but I don't do anything productive in Windows anyway so I haven't bothered with it.
I hate re-booting with a passion, I restart my pc maybe once a month. That's why dual-booting always ticked me off, I had to restart my pc to get to the other OS. I would end up convincing myself that I didn't need to go to the other OS after all.
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Post by rujasu » Thu Oct 04, 2007 9:59 pm

I'm currently dual-booting (Windows for emergencies, basically) but from what I've been hearing, it's becoming much easier to run Windows in a virtual box.

But yeah, programs like Photoshop are a pain. Photoshop takes a lot of power to run, so you'd probably have a tough time running it on a VM, and it won't run on WINE whatsoever. I'm surprised there hasn't been a significant effort to improve/replace the GIMP, but then again the FOSS movement is spread thin enough as it is.
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Post by Drakkoon » Fri Oct 05, 2007 4:26 pm

There are plans to remake the GIMP interface, but I think the devs are split on this.
And Photoshop CS2 ran great on wine, for 1 time only. The other times it said I had an hardware error. I don't understand how some are able to run it.

And I've tried virtual machines, but you can't make a virtual copy of your own system (well atleast I don't know how) so it's kinda hard to do anything that requires some 3D power, but works fine for most things.
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Post by Winter Knight » Fri Oct 05, 2007 10:53 pm

I have tried to switch to Linux several times since the late 90's. It usually just didn't take. Part of the problem was trying to get the network working. I didn't know how. To read something online, such as "Setting Up Your Network In Linux", I had to reboot to Windows. Then, to try something I learned, I had to reboot back into Linux. And it wouldn't work. I learned years later that I was using a "win-modem," and that there weren't any drivers for it.

Several things helped me switch. I was living with my girlfriend at the time, and bought her a computer. At first, I tried sharing our dialup internet access by using Windows Internet Connection Sharing (ICS). That was a pain. Every time I wanted to reboot my computer for whatever reason, she would lose internet access. I solved it by using a third machine--a Pentium II, and installed smoothwall on it. I bought an external hayes compatible modem. This setup worked great. I didn't even have to disconnect dialup when I rebooted my own computer. To anyone stuck on dialup, I recommend a dedicated firewall just for that reason, even if you don't need a network.

When I decided to try Linux again, I didn't have to setup a dialup modem to it. That helped a lot. I chose Damn Small Linux. I only chose it because it only took a few hours to download on dialup, whereas something like Debian would have taken a week. However, I recommend it to newbies now, because if you hose your system, all you have to do to fix it is reboot. It is a LiveCD.

I was still frequently rebooting from Linux to Windows and back, though. There were some things I needed Windows for. And I was still more comfortable in Windows. I was using it more often. I decided to build myself a new computer, so I wouldn't have to reboot so much. That decision paid off. I also recommend it to anyone trying to switch. Rebooting is just too much of a hassle, and takes too much time. A semi-decent second computer (PIII) is less than $100, if you know how to buy parts and build a computer.

I don't play games as much as I used to. That probably helped the switch too.

I started using Damn Small Linux a few years ago, at version 0.9.0.1. I started using Debian a little over a year ago. I started using stable (Sarge), and then moved to Testing last December when I became a maintainer. Debian is easier to modify, and I have it just the way I want it. I have never re-installed. I have a dedicated Windows box, which is slightly less powerful than my Linux box. It usually just sits here, dormant.

To all newbies, I recommend:
* getting a second computer
* LiveCD
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